Ralph Nurnberger, Ph.D.


History and Political Science

Ralph Nurnberger, Ph.D., is a widely acclaimed speaker who brings humor, current political insights, and historical background to his presentations. In addition to giving talks nationally and at The Smithsonian Institute, Professor Nurnberger has appeared as an analyst on television and radio programs. He has also spoken internationally and on a number of cruises. He has given presentations on a wide range of historical and political topics at Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at FAU. Professor Nurnberger taught at Georgetown University for 38 years and was named Professor of the Year by the Graduate School of Liberal Studies in 2003.

The Roosevelt Administration and the Holocaust

One of the most politically-charged questions in American history deals with how the administration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt reacted to the Nazis. In this newly revised and updated presentation, Professor Nurnberger will review many of the specific examples of actions taken — and not taken — by the Roosevelt Administration, as well as the rationale behind these decisions.

In Roosevelt’s first two terms, the key issues revolved around immigration. The American response to those who sought to flee from Nazi oppression was shaped by domestic political factors, including the Depression, nativism and anti-Semitism. In addition to quotas and other impediments that made it difficult for Jewish refugees to come to the United States, this presentation will analyze a number of specific incidents, including why Cuba and then the United States turned away over 900 German Jewish refugees on the ocean liner S.S. St. Louis.

After the start of World War II, the German army moved throughout Europe. The lives of ever-increasing numbers of Jews were threatened and extinguished. This presentation will review how the United States responded, especially after the administration learned about the Holocaust.
Register Early! There is a $5 charge for registering on the day of a one-time lecture or event.

Course # F1TC — One Time Event
Place:Auditorium, Lifelong Learning Complex, Jupiter Campus
Dates:Tuesday, December 10 2019
Time:9:30 - 11 AM
Fee:$30 / member; $35 / non-member

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The Protocols of the Elders of Zion

The Persistence of Evil

The wonderful musical “Fiddler on the Roof” is based upon stories written by “Sholem Aleichem,” who has been called the “Yiddish Mark Twain.” He wrote about life in the region of Eastern Europe known as the “Pale of Settlement.” It had the largest component (over 40 percent) of the world Jewish population in the late 19th and early 20th centuries (over 5 million people). Just as Tevye the Dairyman and his family in the musical, most Jews lived in shtetls (Yiddish for “little towns”), since they were forbidden to live “beyond the Pale.” The assassination of Czar Alexzander II in 1881 was followed by a series of attacks against Jews, called pogroms, which were supported by the Russian secret police. Then, around 1903, a document was published in Russia called “The Protocols of the Elders of Zion,” which may be the most significant anti-Semitic document ever. The author’s identity remains a mystery, which historian Ralph Nurnberger will seek to unravel. Once it was published, the Russian secret police used it; Hitler mentions it in “Mein Kampf”; Henry Ford distributed it; conspiracy theorists cite it to explain the 9/11 attacks; organizers of the August 2017 white nationalist rally in Charlottesville claim it motivated them; it is quoted in the Hamas Charter; and it was the basis for television series produced in Arab countries. The document remains as malicious today as it was when it was originally published.
Register Early! There is a $5 charge for registering on the day of a one-time lecture or event.

Course # F1T7 — One Time Event
Place:Auditorium, Lifelong Learning Complex, Jupiter Campus
Dates:Tuesday, November 12 2019
Time:9:30 - 11 AM
Fee:$30 / member; $35 / non-member

Register Now
 Last Modified 2/12/15